How to communicate your brand vision
One of the best ads ever made doesn't show the product. There's not a computer in sight. No mention of megahertz and features. Not even benefits of owning an Apple computer. And yet, nearly 40 years later, we're still talking about it. That's the power of communicating a brand vision.
Brand vision
Henry Ford's vision catapulted the Ford Motor Company to the top of the automobile industry in the early 20th century. Because of his vision of a car in every garage, he adapted the moving assembly line process to car manufacturing. This enabled his company to make, market, and sell their crown jewel - the Model T at a significantly lower price than any of their competitors. For a while, Ford was the face of innovation.
A brand is a mental space a business, organization, or even a person holds in people's heads. It's a perception, a feeling. But also a promise. If people buy your product, they do so with a set of expectations. No one buys an iPhone expecting it to break down in two weeks. Apple promises that won't happen, and they keep that promise to a reasonable enough degree.
Productocracy
A productocracy is "a product or a service that has a distinctive value skew in the marketplace which incites unsolicited recommendations from its current customers, creating new customers."
People often ask me what's the difference between e-commerce and digital marketing. I'm always stunned by this question. To me, the answer has always seemed obvious and intuitive. Until I actually thought about it.
Waterfall
Locus of control is one of the most important psychological predispositions, yet few people are talking about it. If you're in business or thinking of going into business, then you need to understand it.
Motivation is one of the biggest dream-killers in existence. It's right up there with fear of failure, procrastination, and Netflix. That's why motivational videos on YouTube get millions of hits while the people watching them go through the motions. And why so few live with purpose and intent.
"This isn't my first time at the gym", he said while rolling his eyes. I'd just told him he was on the express train to Snap City (not a fun place to be, especially as a teenager). His deadlift form was horrible, which could've led to a serious injury, so I corrected him. Yet the kid was having none of it.
Just fuckin' start
I fell head first onto the concrete. It was ugly, painful, and (lucky for my face) metaphorical. This educational fall determined how I'd live the next four years of my life - working a 9 to 5, slowly sinking into an existential abyss of my own making. Every time the alarm rang and I didn't feel like getting up, was a painful reminder I had failed at making it on my own. It was a tough pill to swallow. Barrels of coffee and the occasional energy drink I consumed helped me stay awake through the toughest of times, but there was nothing that could help with the growing frustration. There I was - trapped once again. I had to get away.
The result of a fixed mindset.
"You haven't changed a bit", I said. It wasn't a compliment. I'd been talking to the man sitting across from for the past hour. He was a childhood friend of mine and we hadn't seen each other in 10 years. During that time, he had stayed in the exact same position physically, mentally, career-wise. In every conceivable way, he was in a time capsule.